When You’re Walked Over, Pushed Aside, Overlooked: Outdo

I'm one of those quiet controllers. I don't have the loudest opinion about where we go to dinner or what to have for dinner or which curtains look best. Opinions I have, but voicing them amongst those with stronger (or louder) ones isn't really my thing.

I'm a cheap date, I tell my husband often, mostly because I'd rather peruse a used bookstore and come out empty-handed than a fancy rooftop dinner with micro-greens and chickens who had names. I like things simple and peaceful and quiet and easy. I want to slip in and slip out, mostly unnoticed, and hold myself to a predetermined number of what I call "good conversations" with folks at most social events. (Usually two is my goal, but if I get four I feel pretty okay about that.) This is how an introvert socials so hard.

I quietly control, though, by the seething Wish I'd Saids and growing Piles of Regrets I let build up in my heart. I allow myself to be pushed over, walked on, shifted around, and then one day, I'm surprised at the resounding “no” gurgling up from the mire inside. "No more." The Wishing I'd Said and Piling of Regrets has spoken, and Lore reached her limit.

Giving Our Preferences Away

I don't believe in limits, mostly. I believe in going the extra mile, turning the other cheek, giving my shirt and my cloak. And I believe most preferences and opinions are the modern-day cheeks and cloaks and miles, especially for the modern-day American who has all the shirts she needs and probably more than she needs. What else is there to give? Oh. My preferences.

Preferences are everywhere, and the thing about them is they're not wrong to have. There's a God who knit us together, crafting each of us with specificity and precision. He knows our inclinations and proclivities and also knows we are dust. He knows dust hasn't got much to say for itself and probably wants to say as much for itself as it can. This comes out as preferences. And whether we have loud opinions or silent ones, we all have a preference or two or fifty or seven hundred.

Outdo One Another

Romans 12:10 says, "Outdo one another in showing honor," and this means, literally, give preference to one another. Give my preference—the unique sometimes God-given desire I have, and even my preference for having a preference—away, deferring to the preference of another. Outdo my preference with theirs.

This is convicting to me this morning because all this week I've felt shoved about by the preferences of others. My ideas and my plans and my hopes were pushed aside by the preferences of someone else, but instead of giving those preferences to them, I felt taken from in them. I felt as though my desires were stolen and someone else's given the star place. I'm convicted this morning because, well, that's no way to live.

What does it mean to not need to control the outcome of a situation but also not need the tally marks of self-righteousness for keeping silent as your preferences are overlooked? What does it mean to go about outdoing one another in honor?

Letting Go

I think it means holding loosely to what we think is best, even if we really, really, really think it's best. I think it means posturing ourselves as servants more than masters. I think it means letting go of what we envision and giving instead to the vision of Christ—which is to serve more than we're served. I don't know fully how to do this because I'm an American and we like our opinions with a side of opinions, but I also know the Holy Spirit lives inside of me, bearing fruit I cannot bear on my own.

And He bears the fruit of self-control—not me. The Spirit within me bears the fruit of a controlled self, freeing me to not control others and outcomes and opinions aplenty. He frees me to outdo my sisters and brothers in honor, truly making it my preference to overlook my preference and give extravagantly to them.

This is a tough word for me today because I don't want to give up or give over. I'm weary of feeling like a floor mat, of being expected to capitulate to the expectations of others and not speaking up for my own—however unimportant—opinion. But I also know the Spirit inside of me who compels me toward self-control also comforts me when I feel crushed.

I'm praying for you and me today, as our preferences and proclivities get shuffled around and overlooked. I'm praying instead of feeling stolen from, we can embrace the words of Romans 12:10 and work to give that honor away before it can even think of being stolen. I'm praying that we become obedient, as Christ was, to the painful work of the Father in regard to our sin. And I'm praying that the Spirit comforts us when we're weak. I need that prayer today for my own heart, so I'm going to share it with you in case you do, too.

This post originally appeared at Sayable.net.

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About the Author

Lore Ferguson Wilbert

Lore Ferguson Wilbert

Lore Ferguson Wilbert is a writer, thinker, and learner. She blogs at Sayable.net, tweets @lorewilbert, and posts photos on Instagram @lorewilbert. She has a husband named Nate, a puppy named Harper Nelle, and too many books to read in one lifetime.